insinuate yourself (into something)


insinuate yourself (into something)
insinuate yourself (into something) phrase
to get into a situation or position by behaving in a way that is not sincere

Somehow he always manages to insinuate himself into our plans.

Thesaurus: to do something dishonestsynonym
Main entry: insinuate

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • worm your yourself into something — ˌworm your way/yourself ˈinto sth derived (disapproving) to make sb like you or trust you, in order to gain some advantage for yourself Syn: insinuate yourself • He managed to worm his way into her life. Main entry: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • insinuate — UK [ɪnˈsɪnjueɪt] / US [ɪnˈsɪnjuˌeɪt] verb [transitive] Word forms insinuate : present tense I/you/we/they insinuate he/she/it insinuates present participle insinuating past tense insinuated past participle insinuated to say something unpleasant… …   English dictionary

  • insinuate — in|sin|u|ate [ ın sınju,eıt ] verb transitive to say something unpleasant in an indirect way: insinuate (that): He even went as far as insinuating that Roger was a liar. insinuate yourself (into something) to get into a situation or position by… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • insinuate — in|sin|u|ate [ınˈsınjueıt] v [T] [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of insinuare, from sinuare to bend, curve ] 1.) to say something which seems to mean something unpleasant without saying it openly, especially suggesting that… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • insinuate — verb (T) 1 to say something which seems to mean something unpleasant without saying it directly, for example saying indirectly that someone is being dishonest: insinuate that: Are you insinuating that the money was stolen? 2 insinuate yourself… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • tragedy — /traj i dee/, n., pl. tragedies. 1. a dramatic composition, often in verse, dealing with a serious or somber theme, typically that of a great person destined through a flaw of character or conflict with some overpowering force, as fate or society …   Universalium

  • To wind off — Wind Wind, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wound} (wound) (rarely {Winded}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Winding}.] [OE. winden, AS. windan; akin to OS. windan, D. & G. winden, OHG. wintan, Icel. & Sw. vinda, Dan. vinde, Goth. windan (in comp.). Cf. {Wander}, {Wend}.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wind out — Wind Wind, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wound} (wound) (rarely {Winded}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Winding}.] [OE. winden, AS. windan; akin to OS. windan, D. & G. winden, OHG. wintan, Icel. & Sw. vinda, Dan. vinde, Goth. windan (in comp.). Cf. {Wander}, {Wend}.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wind up — Wind Wind, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wound} (wound) (rarely {Winded}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Winding}.] [OE. winden, AS. windan; akin to OS. windan, D. & G. winden, OHG. wintan, Icel. & Sw. vinda, Dan. vinde, Goth. windan (in comp.). Cf. {Wander}, {Wend}.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wind — Wind, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wound} (wound) (rarely {Winded}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Winding}.] [OE. winden, AS. windan; akin to OS. windan, D. & G. winden, OHG. wintan, Icel. & Sw. vinda, Dan. vinde, Goth. windan (in comp.). Cf. {Wander}, {Wend}.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English